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AWM at ICIAM 2003

The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), with the support of the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the US Office of Naval Research (ONR) is sponsoring a minisymposium (2094) for women researchers at the Fifth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 03), July 7-11, 2003, Sydney, Australia.


Applied Modelling and Numerical Simulations

ICIAM 2003 Minisymposium 2094

This minisymposium is co-sponsored by the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) and women in applied mathematics in Australia. The speakers are female applied mathematicians who are early in their careers. Two speakers are from the USA and two speakers are from Australia. Two talks involve biological/medical applications.

Date: Wednesday, 9 July 2003
Time: 11.00 - 13.00
Location: SHA2
Organizers: Suzanne Lenhart, Kerry Landman, Maeve McCarthy

Speakers: (Click on name to see author's abstract.)
11.00 Belinda Barnes, Australian National Laboratory, Australia
"Patch/System Dynamics across Scales"
11.30 Jane Sexton, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
"Bhopal and Bagasse: Understanding Combustion with Mathematics"
12.00 Monica K. Hurdal Florida State University, USA
"Modelling and Visualizing Human Brain Data"
12.30 Jennifer Ryan, Chi-Wang Shu, Brown University, and Harold L. Atkins, NASA-Langley Research Center
"Extension and Applications of Post-Processing for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method"


Organizers


Abstracts For Applied Modelling and Numerical Simulations

ICIAM 2003 Minisymposium 2094

Click on title to return to schedule.


"Patch/System Dynamics across Scales"

In this paper we develop a mathematical framework for vegetation modelling across scales, linking individual plants and their interactions within populations to the continental scale system. The basis for the model is changing mass, and the approach is that of dynamical systems. Self thinning is included via a crowding factor, which serves as a link between the individual and groups of individuals, and disturbance (both regular and stochastic) is discussed together with its impact at the larger scale. Applying this approach allows a comparison between the dynamics of system dry mass, total mass and volume, as well as an understanding of the impact on the dynamics of variation at smaller scales. Carbon dynamics and the interaction/competition between vegetation species are natural consequences of this modelling approach, and are established and discussed.

Belinda Barnes
Australian National Laboratory
Australia


"Bhopal and Bagasse: Understanding Combustion with Mathematics"

Uncontrolled ignition during a chemical reaction often has destructive consequences - high temperatures, volatile gases, explosions and fire are all possibilities. In this presentation, I will examine two ignition events. The first example triggered the terrible circumstances in Bhopal 1984 where an explosion at the Union Carbide plant resulted in the injury and death of thousands of people. Conversely, my second example is not a singular tragic event, but rather a periodic one which continues to affect Australia's sugar industry. Large quantities of bagasse (sugarcane residue) remain after production which contain high levels of water. This water content in conjunction with the geometrical features of the bagasse pile, can lead to spontaneous ignition. The advent of dynamical systems theory in the 1960s has led to an increased understanding of combustion. Here, I will discuss the modelling of these two examples and how this theory has contributed to methods to more safely conduct these sorts of processes.

Jane Sexton
Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Australia


"Modelling and Visualizing Human Brain Data"

The rate at which neuroimaging data is being acquired, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and functional MRI (fMRI) data, has increased significantly, with many studies involving hundreds of subjects. As a result, there is a requirement for automated processing, analysis and visualization methods for cortical data. In this seminar, I will describe some of the mathematical methods and approaches we have adopted to process MRI data. Methods including segmentation, surface generation, cortical flattening and the creation of a coordinate system in a cortical region of interest to assist with visualizing, identifying and delineating anatomical boundaries, and localizing functional brain data will be discussed.

Monica K. Hurdal
Florida State University
USA


"Extension and Applications of Post-Processing for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method"

In this talk, extension and applications of a post-processing technique for the Discontinuous Galerkin based on negative-order norm estimates will be presented. The technique used was introduced by Cockburn, Luskin, Shu and S\"{u}li and improves the accuracy of the DG method for time-dependent linear hyperbolic equations from order $k+1$ to order $2k+1$ for a uniform mesh. Extensions of the result will be given for more complex mesh structures, variable and discontinuous coefficient equations and aeroacoustic applications.

Jennifer Ryan
Brown University
USA
Chi-Wang Shu
Brown University
USA
Harold L. Atkins
NASA-Langley Research Center
USA


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